Assessment

Formative Assessment versus Summative Assessment

Formative Assessments versus Summative Assessments

Categories: Assessment

Based on Common Formative Assessment and Embedded Formative Assessment

Defining Formative and Summative

Whenever I do an assessment workshop with a group of teachers, I always start with some definitions so that we’re all talking about the same thing. Almost every teacher I’ve worked with is pretty confident about what the difference is between a formative and a summative assessment. Read more

An assessment event

5 Reasons to Attend an Assessment Institute

Categories: Assessment, Solution Tree

You know that feeling you get when you rush, rush, rush to get to a conference after a long day of travel, compounded by months of trying to cram teaching, family, and personal care into an already too-fast-paced life? Perhaps you check into your hotel and unzip the suitcase you packed at home, wondering if you even packed the right clothing. You might ask yourself when you should get breakfast, who you will sit with, and how you will ever manage to relax and learn. You might begin to wonder if attending was more effort than it will be worth. Read more

Teachers giving students feedback on discussions

Feed Students Through Feedback (Small Groups, Big Discussions Part 10)

Categories: Assessment, Instruction

This is the tenth post in a series on student-led, small-group discussions. To read the other posts, see “Small Groups, Big Discussions.” The series explores the challenges to effective small-group discussions and how to address them. The content is connected to the book Deep Discourse.

If you have incorporated the ideas from my past blog posts into your instructional practices and still find your students’ discussions lack substance, it may be due to the feedback they are receiving. After years of research, Hattie (2008) revealed that feedback was among the most powerful influences on achievement and states that students have a greater chance of achieving learning targets when teachers provide ongoing feedback about their progress. Read more

Set criteria for grading student discussions

How to Grade Small-Group Discussion (Small Groups, Big Discussions Part 9)

Categories: Assessment, Instruction

This is the ninth post in a series on student-led, small-group discussions. To read the other posts, see “Small Groups, Big Discussions.” The series explores the challenges to effective small-group discussions and how to address them. The content is connected to the book Deep Discourse.

Often, teachers wonder how they should grade students to hold them accountable during discussions. A conversation with one teacher illustrates the questions many teachers ask. She said, “I want to include more student-led discussions in my classroom, but I don’t know how I would grade their work to hold them accountable. They won’t speak up if they think they aren’t receiving points. How might I grade individual students for their work during discussions? What criteria should I use to grade them as they engage in discussions?” Read more